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Dow Reveals Heat Transfer Fluids For Solar Systems

Thu, 06/04/2009 - 7:58am

By The Associated Press - June 4, 2009

MIDLAND, Mich., -- The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW) is shedding light on Concentrating Solar Power systems (CSP) with DOWTHERM(TM) A heat transfer fluids which collect, transport and store solar generated heat.

CSP technology uses mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. DOWTHERM(TM) A heat transfer fluids collect the heat energy and transport it to a power generating station. The transported heat converts water to steam, which in turn drives turbines to make electricity.

"We are committed to harnessing the vast potential of the sun to continue setting the standard for sustainability," said Neil Hawkins, Dow's vice president of sustainability. "In addition to innovations in sustainable chemistry that result in products like DOWTHERM(TM) A, we've also made significant advancements in photovoltaic technology through the development of a game-changing residential solar shingle by the Dow Solar Solutions business. Our 2015 sustainability goals are driving innovation that is good for business and good for the world."

Dow has supplied, or is in the process of supplying, enough DOWTHERM(TM) A globally to generate more than 500 megawatts of electricity from the sun - positioning its Performance Fluids Business as the leading supplier of heat transfer fluids in the world for parabolic trough based solar systems. Solar power producers in the United States, Middle East, Spain, Australia, India and other locations are tapping into Dow's technology and world-scale production and supply capabilities.

Recent projects in Spain will be using more than 5,000 metric tons of DOWTHERM(TM) A heat transfer fluids that will eventually generate enough electricity for about 120,000 households. These plants will also prevent the release of about 350,000 tons of carbon dioxide that would have otherwise been released into the atmosphere had traditional fuels been used.

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