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Chem.Insider Daily

Bees Love The Buzz of Caffeine a Little Too Much

October 19, 2015 1:54 pm | by GeoBeats News | Comments

The plant gets the upper hand on the bee, through an action that's akin to drugging.


Oil Tanker Runs Aground in Portugal

October 19, 2015 9:55 am | by Reuters | Comments

Portuguese authorities are battling to free an empty oil tanker which ran aground near Lisbon after breaking down at sea.


What is 'Herbal Viagra?'

October 16, 2015 9:42 am | by CNN | Comments

Studies have shown that the supplements are cut with ingredients found in rat poison, paint and printer ink.


The World's Smallest Robots: Rise of The Nanomachines

October 14, 2015 9:22 am | by Reactions | Comments

Nanomachines – including nano-sized motors, rockets and even cars – are many orders of magnitude smaller than a human cell, but they have huge promise. In the future, they could deliver drugs anywhere in the body, clean up oil spills and might even be used as artificial muscle cells.


Boone Pickens: Goldman Way Off on $20 Oil

October 12, 2015 3:26 pm | by CNNMoney | Comments

BP Capital Chairman Boone Pickens tells CNNMoney's Cristina Alesci why he knows more about oil than Goldman Sachs and weighs in on Russia and why Vladimir Putin may want to work with the Middle East.


Steyer: People Are Going to Pollute Their Rear Ends Off

October 6, 2015 3:05 pm | by Bloomberg Business | Comments

Tom Steyer, founder at Farallon Capital, discusses government rules for making companies pay for their pollution and subsidies paid to fossil fuel producers.


Biofuel From Whisky Byproducts Better Than Ethanol, Says Maker

October 5, 2015 9:42 am | by Reuters | Comments

A Scottish company is planning the large-scale commercial production of biobutanol made from the waste products of whisky fermentation.


How Pee Brought You The Modern World

October 5, 2015 8:58 am | by Reactions | Comments

You might not believe it, but there was a time when urine, yes urine, was prized by chemists. Pee played a part in some of the most significant discoveries in science, and it helped shape the modern world.


New Hydrogel For 3-D Printing Gets Jiggly With It

October 1, 2015 2:51 pm | by CEN Online | Comments

Researchers have developed a hydrogel support matrix that enables 3-D printers to create structures from materials including polymers and living cells like never before. Watch this video to see it in action.


In The Mix: What Does Shell’s Alaskan Retreat Mean?

September 29, 2015 4:23 pm | by Meagan Parrish, Editor | Comments

Late Sunday, Royal Dutch Shell announced that the company is ditching its bid to drill for oil and gas offshore in Alaska. What does it mean for the future of Alaskan drilling and the energy market? We’re bundling up and trekking North to find out on today’s In the Mix.


The History of Volkswagen, 'The People's Car'

September 29, 2015 9:34 am | by Wall Street Journal | Comments

Volkswagen has always been more than a car. It occupies a special place in German society. WSJ's Dipti Kapadia goes through some of the iconic moments for the German auto maker, now caught in a scandal over emissions.


No More Flat Tires? Scientists Make Rubber That Can Heal Itself

September 25, 2015 9:47 am | by American Chemical Society | Comments

Few things will ruin a day faster than a flat tire. But what if you never had to break out that spare again? Scientists have developed a new type of rubber that can heal itself after a tear or break.


How Chemicals Play Head Games And Contribute to Obesity

September 24, 2015 9:59 am | by Society for Neuroscience | Comments

Scientists studying obesity have identified a number of brain chemicals that regulate appetite and play a role in weight gain.


In The Mix: Why DuPont’s C8 Trial Matters

September 23, 2015 9:45 am | by Meagan Parrish, Editor | Comments

How will DuPont handle this sticky situation and what will the fallout be for C8? We’re finding out on today’s In the Mix.


Are Flushable Wipes Really Flushable?

September 22, 2015 10:04 am | by CEN Online | Comments

In this episode of Speaking of Chemistry, Lauren Wolf explains that, even though flushable wipes are molecularly designed to break down in sewers, the answer’s complicated.



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